If type 1 diabetes is suspected, your urine will be tested to look for the presence of a byproduct produced when muscle and fat tissue are used for energy because the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the available glucose (ketones). Your doctor will also likely run a test to see if you have the destructive immune system cells associated with type 1 diabetes called autoantibodies.
Aside from managing your diabetes, a diabetes diet offers other benefits, too. Because a diabetes diet recommends generous amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, following it is likely to reduce your risk of cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancer. And consuming low-fat dairy products can reduce your risk of low bone mass in the future.

Oral diabetes medications may also come in combination tablets such as Metaglip (glipizide/metformin), Prandimet (repaglinide/metformin), Glucovance (glyburide/metformin), Janumet (sitagliptin/metformin), Avandamet (rosiglitazone/metformin), Avandaryl (rosiglitazone/ glimepiride), Duetact (pioglitazone/glimepiride), Actoplus Met (pioglitazone/metformin).

DASH is an acronym for “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension” and was designed to help lower blood pressure in people with hypertension (high blood pressure).  This eating pattern promotes eating more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and lower fat or fat-free dairy products, poultry and fish. This eating pattern also limits foods high in sodium (salt) saturated fat, red meat, sweets, added sugars and sugar sweetened drinks.  The DASH diet is also higher in fiber and is rich in nutrients, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, which may help to lower blood pressure.
Check your blood sugar level regularly, and watch for signs and symptoms of low blood sugar — sweating, shakiness, weakness, hunger, dizziness, headache, blurred vision, heart palpitations, irritability, slurred speech, drowsiness, confusion, fainting and seizures. Low blood sugar is treated with quickly absorbed carbohydrates, such as fruit juice or glucose tablets.

It’s not just sugar that causes elevated blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates also break down into sugars. So, choosing the right source of carbs is an essential part of your pre-diabetes diet plan. Refined carbohydrates with a high glycemic index are best avoided, as the body readily transforms them into simple sugars. Instead, choose complex carbohydrates like brown rice, quinoa, barley, steel-cut oats, whole-wheat breads, buckwheat, amaranth and millets.
Insulin is a hormone produced by cells in the pancreas called beta cells. Insulin helps the body use blood glucose (a type of sugar) for energy. People with type 2 diabetes do not make enough insulin and/or their bodies do not respond well to it, leading to elevated blood sugar levels. Oral diabetes medications bring blood sugar levels into the normal range through a variety of ways.
There’s more to diabetes than just cutting back on sugar. The misconception that eating sugar causes diabetes is far from the truth. The real culprit is simple carbohydrates that break down into sugars upon ingestion. Inactivity and a poor metabolism also play a significant role, which is why you need to clean up all your lifestyle choices and lose weight.

Islet Cell Cytoplasmic Autoantibodies (ICA)—Islet cells are clusters of cells in the pancreas that sense blood glucose levels and dole out insulin accordingly. This test looks at the reaction between islet cell antibodies from humans and a variety of islet cell proteins (including beta cells) from an animal pancreas, says Laffel. If your antibodies react with the animal islet cells, you have a marker for type 1. This is the oldest type 1 antibody test, and is not used as frequently today. 

Why am I thirsty all the time but not diabetic

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